Morning Report, 11/7/08

Until the rains begin again, I will probably not be posting, much, unless I have something to say. (I’m a lawyer. I always have something to say!) But this morning, I see smoke-like haze to the north, and out over the ocean. Looks quite a ways away, but I have no information, and darn, I don’t like not having any information. Anyone out there know anything?

This comment from Firefox: “The haze may be from the controlled burn that State Parks is conducting in Andrew Molera State Park. There was a distinct scent of smoke this am in the area around Pfieffer Ridge.  They are burning off some of the brush that has taken over large sections of the park.

They expect to continue on different plots in the park for a few days. Let people know to NOT call 911 when they see smoke or flames in the area but they can contact State Parks or read the posted notices at the Big Sur Center Deli, River Inn Store or MAF if they want more info.

Firefox”

Also, I would just like to add to the explanation about how control burns add nutrients to the soil, that there are a number of native plants that can ONLY be germinated by fire. That is why CNPS people love to come hunting for new finds in the spring, after a fire. Never know what new plants, or rare plants will be discovered!

4 thoughts on “Morning Report, 11/7/08

  1. Kate,
    The haze may be from the controlled burn that State Parks is conducting in Andrew Molera State Park. There was a distinct scent of smoke this am in the area around Pfieffer Ridge. They are burning off some of the brush that has taken over large sections of the park.
    They expect to continue on different plots in the park for a few days. Let people know to NOT call 911 when they see smoke or flames in the area but they can contact State Parks or read the posted notices at the Big Sur Center Deli, River Inn Store or MAF if they want more info.
    Firefox

  2. I know that the smell of smoke triggers some sort of animalistic alarm in my brain & it’s probally a controlled burn like Firefox said, buut when will they switch from controlled burns to safe brush removal where they chip the brush and use it for mulch like the parks departments do in town?

  3. Kate and pendoodles,
    To sort of give an idea WHY an agency would do a control burn over simple brush removal: a burn is not just about removing brush, it is about revitalizing the landscape. As we will see next spring, the fire not only clears away the old vegetation but also puts down a nourishing layer of ash that is Nature’s way of feeding the wildland. The potash from fires is an essential element to proper plant growth, too little and plants cannot build strong stems or flower properly. A influx of wildfire ash will encourage wildflowers and blooming plants. Fire also releases seeds of fire dependent plants such as some pines, ceanothus, and others that need the fire to burn open their seed capsules and allow the seeds to fall into a rich bed of clean earth and fire ash.
    Ironically, if we allowed more burns, the landscape would probably be more colorful, park-like and less prone to larger more devastating fires. Old Bill Post tells stories of how Big Sur folk (including his won family) used to set fires on their ranches in November until the Forest Service banned the practice. I believe that some folks on the South Coast kept doing it well into the 60’s or even later.
    Firefox

  4. Firefox thanks for your info. I do realize that controlled fires revitalize the forest, it just feels like in a drought season etc… a two bladed sword if you know what I mean.

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